Course Details

Course Code SS18
Level Undergraduate
QTAC Code 094601
Duration 3F/6P
Entry Requirements Completion of Year 12 (or equivalent); English language proficiency and Personal suitability requirements apply.

Candidates who hold a PACFA-accredited qualification are not eligible for admission to this course.

Assumed Knowledge English – SA (QCAA) (or equivalent)
Mode On Campus, Mixed Mode
Credit Points 240
Starting Semesters 1 & 2
Overseas Students Available
CRICOS Code 076206B
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General Information

The Bachelor of Counselling is a three-year course (full time equivalent), and is available on both a full time study and part time basis. The course is intended to equip students for employment in both secular and Church-related counselling contexts, as well as providing access to appropriate levels of recognition with relevant professional associations. As well as incorporating foundational understandings, it includes opportunities for critical reflection on counselling theory and practice, and in-depth engagement with key areas and issues of counselling.

The Bachelor of Counselling was formerly known as the Bachelor of Social Science (Counselling).

As a ‘first training’ course, the Bachelor of Counselling is not available to students who already hold a PACFA-accredited qualification.

Successful engagement in the Counselling profession requires a level of personal maturity and self-awareness. PACFA (Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia) therefore recommends that current and prospective students are assessed for their personal growth and likely suitability for the Counselling profession. Entry to the Bachelor of Social Science (Counselling) is thus subject not only to academic requirements, but also personal suitability as assessed through an interview, a personal statement and referee reports.

Students should note that certain units can be completed on campus only, in either Internal or Intensive modes (as offered). Further information is available from the School of Social Sciences Administration Office or in the Bachelor of Counselling information contained in the Social Sciences Courses Handbook.

Students who wish to gain registration with a professional body recognised by PACFA (Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia) following completion of the Bachelor of Counselling are required to complete a minimum of 10 units on campus (this includes both Internal and Intensive modes). Students are responsible to ensure that they fulfil this requirement in their course planning.

The maximum time allowed for the completion of the Bachelor of Counselling is 10 years. Extensions beyond this time may be approved where extenuating circumstances exist.

Students who successfully complete the Diploma of Social Science may articulate into the Bachelor of Counselling. Students who are enrolled in the Bachelor of Counselling may exit with the Diploma of Social Science, subject to the completion of course requirements.

Course Accreditations

The Bachelor of Social Science (Counselling) is:

Career Outcomes

  • Counsellor
  • Chaplain
  • Pastoral Counsellor
  • Christian School Counsellor
  • Rehabilitation Counsellor
  • Community Worker
  • Youth Worker
  • Personal Support Worker

English Language Proficiency Requirements

Applicants for whom English is not their first language must provide certified documentary evidence that their secondary schooling, or tertiary studies of at least one year, was conducted in the English language or they have satisfactory results in an acceptable English Language Proficiency examination (see table below). Results are to be no more than two years old as at the commencement of the course of study.

Examination Minimum result
IELTS 6.5 overall, with a minimum of 6.0 in all subtests
ISLPR Not accepted
TOEFL 575 or better (pBT – paper-based); 90 or better with no subscore lower than 20 (iBT – internet-based)
STAT 156 or higher in the Verbal component

Personal Suitability Requirements

Since scholastic achievement is not the sole requirement in becoming an effective counselling practitioner, additional factors are considered in assessing applicants’ suitability for entry into the course. In accordance with the requirements of the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA) Training Standards (2014, p. 2), personal suitability is measured against the following standards:

1.1 Principles

1.1.1 Students need to demonstrate the presence of some fundamental human capacities as a pre-requisite for beginning training as a psychotherapist/ counsellor. These capacities can be demonstrated through live interviews, observing student’s participation in an experiential workshop, referees, etc.

1.1.2 Self-awareness. Students need to demonstrate the capacity to relate in a facilitative way with others and to reflect on and examine the impact of these actions.

1.1.3 Since therapy is fundamentally a relational art, students should demonstrate a relational capacity. This could be in a one-to-one therapeutic situation or, especially if the therapeutic modality involves couples/family/ group work, an ability to work with a group or team.

1.1.4 Students should demonstrate a capacity to understand and practice ethical behaviour and be prepared to follow a code of ethics, which is an integrated part of the training program.

1.1.5 The above qualities presume a certain level of mature life experience on the part of the applicant, and this is shown by the capacity to reflect on and learn from experience, including being open to positive and challenging feedback.

1.2 Process

1.2.1 The process of selection should be non-discriminatory on the grounds of gender, class, cultural background, sexual preference, disability or beliefs.

The criteria against which an applicant’s personal suitability for entry to the course is assessed are:

  • Recommendation by two personal referee’s reports;
  • Capacity to provide evidence, through a personal statement and at an interview with an appropriate member of the School of Social Sciences, of aptitude and potential for counselling in terms of self-awareness, relational capacity and ability to understand and practice ethical behaviour within the context of relevant life experience and overall personal maturity;
  • Preparedness to complete a minimum of 30 hours of personal counselling while enrolled in the course;
  • Agreement to adhere to the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA) Code of Ethics.

These criteria are assessed through the triangulation of information collected through each applicant’s personal statement, referee reports and interview.

Applicants are notified that the progress of their application is linked to this process. This process is designed to be open and transparent and to be equitable for all applicants.

Professional Recognition

The Bachelor of Social Science (Counselling) is accredited by the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA). This means that graduates of the award can become Graduate Members of PACFA member organisations including the Christian Counsellors Association of Australia (CCAA) and Queensland Counsellors Association (QCA). Information pertaining to these organisations appears below.

Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA)

The Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA) is a peak body for member associations which meet the standards developed by consensus as appropriate for professional practitioners within the disciplines of Counselling and Psychotherapy in the Australian community.

The Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA) is the Federation of Professional Associations of psychotherapists and counsellors formed after lengthy national consultation involving many of the leading educators in these fields.

There are 31 member associations which accept the professional standards set and which adhere to the ethical guidelines established by PACFA. These member associations meet the standards developed by consensus as appropriate for professional practitioners within the disciplines of Counselling and Psychotherapy in the Australian community.

For more information, visit the PACFA website at http://www.pacfa.org.au/

Christian Counsellors Association of Australia (CCAA)

The Christian Counsellors Association of Australia (CCAA) is a member organisation of PACFA with chapters in every state. The aim of the CCAA is to support and encourage counsellors to integrate their Christian faith with their practice at a professional level. Similar associations exist in Britain and the United States and these have grown enormously as a greater number of Christians seek accreditation with a supportive body conducted on faith principles that also has very high standards of excellence. The rise of counselling in Australia as a viable profession has become more possible with associations such as the CCAA, not only demanding a very high standard from their members, but also encouraging appropriate and relevant discussion of the Christian faith.

For more information, visit the CCAA website at http://www.ccaa.net.au/

Queensland Counsellors Association (QCA)

The Queensland Counsellors Association (QCA) is a professional association for counsellors and psychotherapists established in 1973 to provide a voice for members. It is a constituent member association of the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia (PACFA).

The QCA is dedicated to supporting its members and enhancing the quality of counselling and psychotherapy services to the community. Consumers can access a counsellor or psychotherapist who has a recognised high standard of training and ethical practice, seek information about matters relating to psychotherapy and counselling, or direct concerns about the professional conduct of a member of the association.

QCA members enjoy a range of benefits including affordable professional development throughout the year, opportunity to network with like-minded colleagues and discounted premiums for professional indemnity insurance.

For more information, visit the QCA website at http://qca.asn.au/

Course Structure

BACHELOR OF COUNSELLING (SS18)

The Bachelor of Counselling comprises a program of core units (220 credit points) and elective units (20 credit points).

The first year of the course comprises a program of core units (80 credit points) that introduce students to concepts regarding Christian worldview, the skills and processes required for academic and professional communication within a higher education context, and foundational knowledge and understanding associated with the applied social sciences and counselling. The Diploma of Social Science is nested within, and constitutes the first year (full time equivalent) of, the Bachelor of Counselling.

The second and third years of the course comprise core units in counselling knowledge, skills and application (140 credit points) and two specialist counselling elective units (20 credit points). At least one elective unit must be taken by internal mode. Students also complete:

  • 200 practicum counselling hours, which are embedded in the units CO367-CO370;
  • 30 hours of personal counselling; and
  • 25 hours of counselling observations, comprising ten hours of site visits and 15 hours of external professional development events.

Students must make application for a Blue Card (or equivalent) and have received this card prior to engaging with children and young people under the age of 18 years of age within the unit CO220 Development Through the Lifespan.

CHC provides sample unit outlines for each unit offered in this course. Should you wish to view the latest version of a unit outline, please contact the Course Coordinator via the School of Social Sciences Administration Office at socsciadmin@chc.edu.au.

In planning their courses, students must consult the relevant Courses Handbook for information regarding course rules and requirements, including unit prerequisite requirements.

Core Units

Christian Studies Units

UNIT SUMMARY SAMPLE UNIT OUTLINE
CS115 Foundations of a Bible-based Christ-centred Worldview Download
CS215 Contours for a Bible-based Christ-centred Worldview Download
CS315 Christianity and Worldviews Download

Professional Units

UNIT SUMMARY SAMPLE UNIT OUTLINE
SO100 Academic and Professional Communication Download
SO102 Introduction to Applied Social Theories Download
SO110 The Person of the Practitioner Download
SO112 Introduction to Human Behaviour Download
SO114 Foundational Interpersonal Skills Download
SO115 Introduction to Applied Social Science Contexts Download
SO310 Transformational Theology for Applied Social Science Practices Download

Counselling Units

CO212 Counselling Approaches Download
CO213 Introduction to Mental Health Download
CO214 Foundational Processes and Strategies in Counselling Download
CO220 Development Through the Lifespan Download
CO221 Group Processes Download
CO222 The Human Narrative and Change Download
CO223 Ethics in Counselling Download
CO314 Advanced Processes and Strategies in Counselling Download
CO367 Reflective Practice: Consolidating Foundations Download
CO368 Reflective Practice: The Therapeutic Relationship Download
CO369 Reflective Practice: External Contexts Download
CO370 Reflective Practice: Personal Practice Framework Download

Elective Units

UNIT SUMMARY SAMPLE UNIT OUTLINE
CO380 Compulsive Behaviours Download
CO381 Mediation and Conflict Resolution Download
CO382 Child and Adolescent Issues Download
CO383 Family Relationship Issues Download
CO384 Expressive Therapies Download
CO385 Grief and Loss Download
CO386 Trauma Counselling Download
CO389 Sexuality, Spirituality and Counselling Download
SO391 Directed Study in the Social Sciences Download